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English 58
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)
and that cities are key to the economy. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, we've had high-profile examples of public-private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. one reason we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money, but to provide oversight, you have somebody to go to when you have a project, a regulator. an interlocutor. we should alloy private money. there's an additional problem. about so-called eminent domain. you can't just clear things out in china they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving. we're building a road here. you got to move out of your apartment tomorrow. we can't do that. it makes it trickier in our older cities to rebuild in the way they did in china. >> it's an interesting analo
you some of the figures. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. now, we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, but we've had some high-profile examples of public/private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. and by the way, one reason when he we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money but just to provide oversight and ombudsman so that you have somebody to go to when off project or regulator, an interlocutor perhaps. we should definitely allow private money. there is an additional problem, and richard probably knows more about this, about so-called eminent domain, where you can't just clear things out. in china, they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving, we're building here a road here. you have to move out of your parm tomorrow.
're seeing most of the growth in large cities. >> what about this gift from random house to all of its employees. pretty nice. >> yes, call it 50 shades of green, if you will. random house, which is the publisher of "50 shades of grey," the lascivious adult novel that's been all the rage this year, the company has seen major uptick in large part because of the book and soars. the ceo announced this week at the holiday party that every one of the employees will get a $5,000 bonus this year. that's really great news especially in the world of publishing, which has been sort of on a downward death spiral. >> that's really nice for them. well, great. thank you very much. morgan brennan. >> in today's one-minute play back. governor chris christie on "the daily show" the universal telethon for hurricane sandy victims and about meeting the boss bruce springsteen back stage. >> he came up, put his hands down. shook his hand. i tried to be cool. i wasn't. then he said, come on, give me a hug. i said, all right. i hugged him. >> did he go, come on, stop. >> no. you know, that's always hard to ju
medallions are required to operate cabs in many large cities including new york. they were first issued in the big apple during the great depression. >> back in 1937, this little piece of tin sold for $10 each. >> his grandfather bought one of the first badges and medallion financial was born. the company has seen quite a return on that first investment and on hundreds more medallions it bought since then. back in the late '70s when the checker cabs were cruising the streets of new york city, a taxi medallion would set you back less than $100,000. now this piece of metal on the front of your cab will set you back more than a million bugs. >> i don't think we ever thought it would hit a million dollar price. they have gone up 15% per year, 70 years. outperforming dow, gold, nasdaq, real estate. you name it. >> analysts marvel at the company's track record. unlike most banks, medal i don't know never had default on taxi loan. >> real estate lending someone defaults it is years before banks get money back. it is terrific collateral. the medallion is the little tin. if somebody doesn't pay
. in westchester county two large cities, yonkers and vernon. [talking over each other] >> of those 80% of people with legal handguns were they in tending and plotting who they were going to attack or were they on the street? what was the climate? >> various array of different crimes but now what we have is crimes tend >> with technology. stuart: i will break in for a second. i want to give you breaking news from the environmental protection agency. the administrator lisa jackson says she will step down. she has been on the job four years. she announced her departure in a statement that came out today. no particular reason for leaving but she says she was ready for new challenges, time with a family and opportunity to make a difference. lisa jackson, administrator of the epa will step down. back to you for a second, peter. we have a list published in the newspaper. everyone who knows where the legal handguns are in each house, name and address of the person who has got them. in newton, conn. we had a dreadful case of legally hunt handguns used to the terrible way by someone who was clearly mental
be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and you would have a full-fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that and the possibiliti
highest violent crime rate of any middle to large-sized city in the country. so you've got a couple things here. you have chosen a path. you said you know what? we like the idea that the democrats are giving to us and you have gone down this path for 50 years and you have nothing to show for it but despair. a bailout is not going to solve your problem. think about what you are doing when you go to vote. would a bailout be a gift, with someone saying straighten your life out now. stuart: i agree with you. this is surely a larger picture here. if detroit wants it and appeals to the president to get some money because they voted for the president, what about california? what about illinois? what about any other of the states which voted overwhelmingly for president obama and are in dire financial shape? it could open the door. quick comment? sandra: absolutely. i think this could be the big change over the next four years, if you hear more cries for help, and they don't get it, maybe that's when the republican party starts to look pretty good. stuart: that will be interesting. next we will sh
still has a huge presence in baghdad. the u.s. embassy there is as large as vatican city with almost 200 american troops providing embassy security and handling sales of u.s. arms to the iraqis. it may be a preview of the future of afghanistan in which the united states is pushing ahead with plans to withdraw troops by 2014. the defense secretary leon panetta says our longest war is at a strategic turning point with a new strategy which has reversed five-year trends of growing violence. he says military commanders there are now expressing optimism. >> all of them believe that we have fundamentally turned the tide in that effort after years in which we lacked the right strategy and the necessary resources to try to achieve the mission we were embarked on. >> shepard: the u.s. still has about 65,000 troops in afghanistan. >>> secretary panetta is talking about the attack object the u.s. outpost in benghazi just hours after more classified hearings on capitol hill. that attack killed the u.s. ambassador to libya, chris stevens and three other americans. now the state department is sending l
a largely black city, you saw folks going out to the suburbs. dollars going with them. that's the struggle. >> it's a struggle, but is the message at the end of your film hopeful or depressing? >> well, it's realistic. we're not saying that detroit is over, it can't rise again. we're saying please double down on detroit. please focus on a lot of us our cities going bankrupt and infrastructural problems in detroit. it's not a message of it's all going to be fine but if people ban together and we focus on places like detroit, of course, there's hope. >> you talk to so many people that are struggling. what did they say they want to get done and how do they expect it to get done? >> they want basic -- i think they want a basic quality of life. they really do. at this point it's donning on them that it's never going to be the way it used to be but they want to have a basic life and that their kids will have at least as good a life as they have. >> what we're seeing in greece is what's happening in detroit. austerity cuts. >> we're seeing a big bailout -- >> right. >> starting with the auto indu
taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state governments. it is good to have them close. i can see what they're doing and to buy and put and see what i can do for the people of the city. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and how it can be impacted. joining us for the discussion is josh . caller: it is a combination of a federal and state program. it usually lasts -- it can be extended up to 93 weeks. it is the extension be on the six month time frame we're talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. host: that is what might be caught -- cut? guest: that is what automatically expires. president obama has said as part of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. republicans have not taken a firm stand. we have seen in the past obama has had to make a deal on taxes. host: what specific benefits do these programs provide? guest: usually some kind o
to hold on to customer. >> we have seen circuit city, borders the bookstore go out of business largely because of competition with amazon and there are a number of smaller retailers that have closed down because they couldn't compete with m son. >> amazon was started in the mid 19950 to sell books online and made no profit. but it became clear that the founder said his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. it expanded in the 1990s into electronics, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002 and today amazon is a $100 billon global company. and though basal has declineded our request for an interview, he recently told for june magazine-snow. >> we like to find is there somebody out there doing some element better than we? two it and if so, how do we improve? >> reporter: while that may be good news for millions of consumers who enjoy amazon's low prices, it is daunting for many businesses, even though that call amazon a partner. >> it's a wolf in sheep's clothing is probably the better wie to describe it. >> this woman is a retail
joins us in new york city. so what is going on here, jamie? >> reporter: there are large concerns and it is pretty serious why we're talking about it again. martha, it has been already five days and there is no sign of this 11-year-old cancer patient known only as emily but authorities haven't given up hope. they have actually expanded their search and making clear that time is not on their side. take a look at this. this is a snippet of surveillance video they're working with, showing emily inside the phoenix children's hospital where she has been treated for lukemia a day before her scheduled discharge. you see her without a wig and iv pole. her mom puts her in different clothes and disguise that allowed her to go undedected outside the hospital as police are describes an as black van. a alert nurse quickly contacted 911. the catheter in emily's heart, doctors say, if it becomes infected could have deadly consequences. the little girl had one arm amputated from a previous infection. >> i can tell you we have searched for these, location of these individuals, both locally and out
is in the community development block grant. that is a block grant that cities use largely. it is very flexible. they can use it to help in their recovery efforts in the most flexible way possible host: new mexico has two air force bases, two national research allowance, and many folks are dependent on federal money for work and assistance programs. for her. -- it will hurt. , democratic caller. caller: explain the logic behind what taxing one of our biggest corporations, which is the religious work -- religious churches and all of that that make $10 trillion a year. and also, how come medicare pays for -- i think it is $1 billion now -- a formula enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. -- for male enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. host: independent caller, go ahead. caller: i would like to bring up the point that you have brought of the federal portion of the moneys and the money does not go -- come out of nowhere. that is the tax dollars, or has been borrowed, were printed. that money is not without cost. i would like to have your opinion on that. thet: you're refe
, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is salt lake what you wanted. >> exactly -- this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. we want to take advantage of the faster speeds that google fire will bring and develop. the sky's the limit. >> reporter: how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> reporter: the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment for top talent to come and stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding that entrepreneur, willing to take a risk in your community is going to grow jobs and ultimately the economy. >> reporter: for now, dreams are growing wild out on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas.
to hold on to customers. >> here in the u.s., we've seen circuit city, the electronics store, borders, the bookstore, go out of business. largely because of competition with amazon. >> reporter: based in seattle, amazon was started in the mid-'90s to sell books online. and for years made no profit. but it soon became clear that founder jeff bezos and his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. they started expanding in the late 1990s into videos, music, games, electronics, kitchenware, clothing, shoes, jewelry, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002, and today, amazon is a $100 billion global company. and though bezos declined our request for an interview, he recently told "fortune" magazine's andy serwer -- >> our goal is to be the most customer obsessed company. is there someone doing some element better than we? if so, how do we improve? >> online shopping is still only 10% of total retail. >> reporter: meaning amazon in all likelihood is just getting started. ben stein told me recently he has never seen a company dominate
. groups trading at 7.7 times earnings, historically trade at ten times, winding down of citi's holdings a benefit to the stock. it's the cheapest in the large cap universe on price to book basis absent bank of america, trading 8% of price to book. i think this is what you want to go into, things with definable catalysts, and when you have a stock rally, the financials participate in the history of markets. it's one you want to hold on. energy side, clearly, energy is not growing in terms of the demand in the u.s.. where it's growing is the rest of the world. >> right. >> we don't have any real opec or non-opec growth in terms of plux. who gets the call? the people who do offshore and deepwater drilling and down hole work. that's why you want to be there. >> global diversions here to some extent. all right, thank you very much, gentlemen, john stevenson and larry, have a great weekend. >> thank you, you too. >> thanks. >> leaders meeting with the president right now this very moment at the white house and the country and entire world watching because if we go off the cliff, markets aroun
. and finally, my personal favorite from new york city, they do three things all the time. and now ban the sale of large sodas and sugary drinks at restaurants. to curb obesity. like that is going to help. more than 200 of these laws will now be on the books come january 1. call me crazy or what. for more on what will look like in the new year, joined by university of maryland economics professor peter morrissey. great to see you again, has been a while, glad to have you back on. we talked about this before but what happens if we go over the cliff, the recession if there is no new deal. what people don't talk about, everybody agrees there'll be some sort of a recession and there is no deal. will the market be happy with any deal or are they looking for something specific? >> any deal would make them happy because that would mean we wouldn't have a recession necessarily. longer-term the market will require the united states to get a handle on the fiscal issues and to start to have a manageable plan on the deficits. we don't get that done in 2013, our bond rating will go down and maybe we print o
. >> it is a very large storm and there's a couple of components to this from kansas city and through des moines then bending back toward milwaukee, that's where the heaviest snow is right now. >> some of those first responders trained for a mass casualty event but certainly never expected to see one. >> you're numb. there is no emotion at that point. you don't fall apart until way later. >> did you fall apart? >> not yet. >> two chicago prisoners are still at large this morning after a daring escape. >> one of their relatives said they could be in paris by now. >> they're cunning, they're daring, and they pulled off something that nobody has pulled off in that jail for 30 years. >> >> i have a problem. >> like a rock? >> the speaker of the house is pushing for a vote on his own plan "b" today. >> if plan "b" doesn't work, they have to go to plan "c," and plan "c," as you know is just pray to end that thegod that the world does end friday. that's plan "c." that's why we're here. >> i'm charlie rose with gayle king and norah o'donnell. the house is set to vote today on spea
to you on the highway. >>> one of the bay area's largest countes is sending large shopping bags to pasture as the new year begins on tuesday and applies to alameda counties and all of the cities. they will note longer be able to give customers one-time use plastic bags. instead, pay a dime for each recyclable paper bag used and similar laws are already in affect in san jose, san francisco and dozens of other california cities and counties. and since its ban took affect, the number of plastic bags littering city streets went down 59%. >> who counsels that stuff? >> i don't know. >>> 58%. 50million experience. >>> some local transis a -- transit agencies are offering free rides for those people wanting free rides tomorrow night. >> and? san francisco, fireworks will go off along the embarcadero. and they have free rides at 11:00 p.m. with later service only for southbound trains and muni will offer free rides with some lines running later than usual and for partiers in sill cop valley, all vta light bus and light rail is free between 7:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. and there will be exte
for several minutes. now, a coastal city did report a three-foot high tsunami. but no large waves. there have been several aftershocks. a couple of 5.0 tremors as well. >>> a man suffered serious injuries after surning around 30 feet after the oakland raider game. christien kafton is live at the coliseum and has been getting reaction from fans and has new information. >> reporter: we have new information, whether this individual fell or jumped. right now, oakland police are treating this as an accidental fall. let's show you the seen. we do know that that fan fell from -- we do know the fan fell from the third level of that concourse down to the lower level here. we've also learned the fall was on the outside of the stadium. so you are looking at the exact areaor the exact type of fall that individual would have taken. that's somewhere between 30 to 50 feet. oakland police told me that they estimated -- estimated that fall between 0 feet. he fell during the -- during the raiders and broncos' game. there were some conflicting reports over this, whether this individual jumped or fell. that inci
on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of my church. i am here to support hr 308. the large capacity ammunition device act which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. hearing reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports
? >> they don't occur all in the same city. they don't occur in the same neighborhoods. they're so rare, they don't occur clustered anywhere, fortunately. there it seems to me restricting access to highpowered weapons and large capacity magazines is a necessary step. as you point out, it's not going to lead to an immediate elimination or even, it seems to me, important reduction in the number of incidents. but overtime i'm reasonably certain it would lead to a reduction in the number of victims. we call these mass killings because of the number of victims involved. and if there's less access to the kinds of weapons that show up disproportionately to these killings over time, there should be fewer victims. >> we could have a tirter assault weapons ban going-forward as well. richard rosenfeld thank you very much for your time tonight. and your work on this issue. >> thank you, ezra. >>> you probably remember jack klugman, he was oscar madison on "the odd couple" and quincy. he was also the most heroic actor to play an american medical examiner in history. and that story is coming up. >>>
they lived in a part of america, particularly a rural area, or an older industrialized city, where the economy has just not come back as rapidly as it has in some better off parts of the country. this is a circumstance that people are in largely because of their region, not because of laziness, certainly. and also, not because of race or age or all the other factors. those factors are always there, and they're always important. but there are some really targeted regional sufferings that are taking place. >> let's be honest here. you mentioned race, gender, we can talk about class. those are the factors that have not motivated many americans to be as empathetic as they might otherwise be. but you would think that the notion that somebody they knew, some uncles, some cousins, some person in your family who's out of work through no fault or his or her own would at least garner the empathy of these folks in congress. why hasn't it worked? >> i think they've written these folks off. and you've written about this, and you know well, that the politics of america is defined increasingly no
. she is still at large. deadly subway pushing in less than a month in new york city. there is no deal yet for the fiscal cliff. but for now we have at least avoided the container cliff. 15,000 dock workers at 15 major u.s. ports and port owners agreeing to extend an expired contract for 30 days. the main issue is container royalties. the heavier the container the more dock workers get paid. owners want to cap payments. a strike would have meant higher prices on many goods like clothing, auto goods and electronic products because they would have been in short supply. emma lou harris could be in trouble with the law. tmz reports that harris is accused of hitting another car on a highway then driving off. the l.a. county d.a. is deciding whether harris will face any charges. in one was hurt. a rep for the singer says it was so minor harris didn't even know she hit the other car. and those are your headlines. >> thank you, juliet. let's talk about this story because this is outrageous. >> dave: unbelievable. >> juliet: sick. >> clayton: here is what vladimir putin did in response to the u
-presidential protesters in tahrir square. in other parts of the city, about two miles from here, as many as 200,000 protesters turned out. these are people who support president morsi. many of them from the muslim brotherhood. a large number were bussed in from rural areas in egypt. many carrying the koran and shouting, god is the law. it was a real show of force and show of public support by those who support egypt's new president. he also announced there will be a constitutional referendum on december 15. it came really after a vote on friday pushing through that constitution in one day. now the nation will have the chance to vote up or down on that constitution. president morsi said the extreme powers he declared for himself last week would end when that constitution is ratified. perhaps in just two weeks' time. it's not clear that's going to be enough for the protesters behind me, some of whom intend to sleep on the square until they drive president morsi from power. rick, back to you. >> rick: steve streaming live from cairo. thanks. >> arthel: closer to home, our neighbor to the south swe
to the bill saying they don't want to approve such large amounts of spending so qukly. around $47 billion of the aid would go to rebuilding damaged areas and helping aid the recovery efforts. the rest would help protect cities against future storms. >>> day eight of our 12 days of giving here on "news4 midday." during these 12 days we're profiling non-profits working to change lives in our area. we invite you to help these great causes. >> keith, it's called boromeo housing. it is a lifeline literally for homeless mothers in washington county around around the washington area. they provide education and housing and critical life skills. you can help this group by calling 202-885-4949. joining me now is darlene bacci and andrea reyes and her little girl. tell us more about this. i understand you're celebrating 25 years. >> yes. this is our 25th anniversary. our mission has not changed in 25 years. we are still an education first, transitional housing program for young single mothers age 16 to 22 and their child. to participate in our program they must be enrolled in school full time, eithe
for the design of washington city. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly all inspiring. in 1821 a european diplomat told congress that it was neither large nor khatami inspiring -- often inspiring -- awe inspiring. perhaps some president would be inclined to become the permanent resident if it were. >> niki goldberg has gathered some of her favorite white house photos. watch on sunday evening. eastern and space -- eastern and pacific. >> my inspiration was the idea that i wanted to explain how it happened. we do know the story of the cold war. we know the documents, we have seen the archives that describe the relationships between roosevelt, stalin, churchill, and truman. we know the main events from our point of view. what i wanted to do was show it from a different angle, from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people subjected to this system. how did people make choices in that system? how did they react? one of the things that happened since 1989 is that the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer hav
in the streets of our cities. it doesn't belong where it can be picked up easily by a grievance killer who can walk into a workplace, a mall, a theate and now an elementary school and kill large numbers. >> ifill: explain to our viewers what you are planning to introduce have changed what happened in newtown connecticut >> well, over time that weapon would be much less available. what we're trying to do is ban the sale, the manufacture, the transfer, the importation of assault weapons. it gets quite technical. i won't go into that right now. granather weapons that people already have. subject those weapons either to licensing or to a trigger lock. and spell out those grandfathered weapons which would be over 900 in the bill so nobody can say, oh, we took our... their hunting weapon away. then i'd be able to say here's your hunting weapon. it's specifically exempted in the bill. >> ifill: we're talking about prospective law, not one... >> that's right, that's right. it would ban approximately 100 weapons by actual name. and then weapons by physical characteristics. >> ifill: let's talk about th
the battle that is on. they are better equipped, they have taken large parts of the northern part of the country, and they are also beginning to tighten around a lot of the central syrian cities, including damascus and trying to go all the way in videotapes, they said that they were going to go to bashar al-assad's house. the russians are changing their tune a little bit. the russians only foreign enable poor. one of the reasons they have been so locked up with they are thinking they want to keep their port. the russians are not the only one involved. lots of people sending weapons into syria. you have a war going on with the wrong, on the other side, you have weapons coming from saudi arabia and qatar in turkey and that is what is supplying the rebels in the civil war that is continuing to rage on. both of those don't really have a lot to gain. they have a lot to lose. their side loses, they will lose a lot. as long as the syrians are willing to keep killing each other in this process, so far the syrian civil war has now claimed 44,000 lives. many people believe there really no m
for washington's city -- he submitted the design for a palace. the americans were not having a palace. in 1821, european diplomats told the congress it was neither large nor awe-inspiring. if that were larger and more elegant, perhaps a president would be inclined to be its permanent resident. >> a photo credit has gathered a few of her favorite white house photos. watch sunday evening at 7:30 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> my inspiration was the idea that the wanted to explain how it happened. we do know the story of the cold war. we have seen the archives that describe relationships between roosevelt, stalin, churchill, and then truman. what i wanted to show what did it feel like to be one of the people who were subjected to this system and how did people make choices in that system and how did they behave. one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have much in common with one another. >> more about life in soviet east germany from the end of world war ii through 1956 from her histor
are not ordering evacuations as of this time for any parts of the city. we're making that decision based on the nature of this storm. although we're expecting a large surge of water, it is not expected to be a tropical storm or hurricane-type surge. with this storm we'll likely see a slow pile-up of water rather than a sudden surge which is what you would expect from a hurricane and which we saw with irene 14 months ago. so it will be less dangerous but make no mistake about it, there will be a lot of water and low-lying areas will experience flooding. jon:. jenna: what was he supposed to do there? if national hurricane center wasn't saying it was hurricane what was he going to do. >> meteorologists were pulling our hair out. we were saying for a week this was epic storm. i don't know what information he was going with. the fact there were no hurricane watches and warnings may have played into him downplaying it. later on he started to say this is serious situation. that was two days before the storm hit. we were saying a week before this would be a big deal. jenna: interesting to see ho
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)